After reaping the blues, we found some great songs that are a part our musical heritage. These classics are listed by when they were written or first released.


NOBODY KNOWS YOU WHEN YOU'RE DOWN AND OUT - BESSIE SMITH
A blues standard, written by Jimmy Cox in 1923. Its lyric, told from the point of view of a one-time millionaire during the Prohibition era.

OUTSIDE WOMAN BLUES - CREAM
It is a standard blues song originally recorded by Blind Joe Reynolds in 1929. The song has been covered by numerous artists most notably by Cream in 1967.

GOING TO BROWNSVILLE - RY COODER
Ry Cooder released in 1995 by Warner Bros. Written by Blind Arthur Blake who recorded about 80 tracks for Paramount Records in the late 1920s and early 1930s.

DITTY WAH DITTY - RY COODER
Paradise and Lunch is the fourth album by roots rock musician Ry Cooder, released in 1974. The final track, "Ditty Wah Ditty," lyrics and music composed by Blind Arthur Blake, showcases a duet between Cooder and jazz pianist Earl "Fatha" Hines.

POLICE DOG BLUES - RY COODER
Blind Blake is a figure of enormous importance in American music. Not only was he one of the greatest blues guitarists of all-time, Blake seems to have been the primary developer of "finger-style" ragtime on the guitar, the six-string equivalent to playing ragtime on the piano.

SITTING ON TOP OF THE WORLD - CREAM
Written by Walter Vinson and Lonnie Chatmon, core members of the Mississippi Sheiks, a popular country blues band of the 1930s.

BLUES BEFORE SUNRISE - ERIC CLAPTON
Written by Leroy Carr recorded sometimes between 1932 and 1934. This version is inspired also by Elmore James's rendition of the song.

CROSSROADS - ROBERT JOHNSON
"Cross Road Blues" is a song by Delta Blues singer Robert Johnson; released on a 78 rpm record in 1936 by Vocalion Records. On March 10, 1968, Cream recorded a live version "Crossroads" from their performance at the Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco.

SWEET HOME CHICAGO - BLUES BROTHERS
It was first recorded in 1936 and is credited to have been written by Robert Johnson. It was released on Vocalion Records and became one of the most popular anthems for the city, after Johnson's death in 1938.


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